Coupe de Robotique France

Good news for the team of Les Karibous (@LesKaribous). The Coupe de Robotique France finally could take place. It was already scheduled for 2020 but like with almost everything else it was rescheduled because of Covid19 restrictions.

The team of Les Karibous were awarded a jury prize. You can see part of the team pictured here above. For transportation purposes they built a special box. The box was equipped with light and sound effects so it could double as a good display case as well.

Below you can see the robots of Les Karibous in action during the competition.

For more information about the robots please visit the Twitter accounts of @LesKaribous and @barbatronic (French). For more information about the competition please visit Coupe de Robotique France.

Team MakerBeam

NVDIA kaya robot

NVDIA created a robot that you can make. They deliberately designed it with 3D printed components and hobbyist components. So a wide range of people will be able to make the robot themselves. It was designed to showcase the Isaac Robot Engine running on the NVIDIA Jetson Nano platform. The Isaac SDK is the main software toolkit for NVIDIA robotics.

MakerBeam is used to create a frame and therefore it is mentioned on their bill of materials. Click here to go to a website of NVDIA with a lot more information about Kaya and how to assemble the Kaya robot.

The bill of materials mentions you can buy MakerBeam on Amazon.com. Which is correct, but you can also buy it from our shop MakerBeam.com directly. We ship worldwide.

Team MakerBeam

FPV drone

An FPV drone is a drone where the user has a first-person (FPV) view of the environment where the drone flies. Stefan from ConstrAct (Austria) made one and created a MakerBeam and Carbon based self-constructed FPV-Drone.

Stefan wanted to build a stable not to expensive drone to fly with a first person view. The chance to have this first person view from high up was the most exciting reason for him to start the build. He used MakerBeam for the arms and carbon for the frame.

The MakerBeam arms are connected with T-slot nuts to the carbon frame – this is a very strong and reliable connection. It survived a couple of crashes, according to Stefan.

It was created for freestyle flying only. For racing it is too heavy. He already had to remove GPS and other parts.

The carbon was cut on his CNC mill. The body was designed on fusion 360.

The electronic parts are:
– Omnibus F4 flight controller (holds the copter stable in the air)
– M8N GPS module (for return to home and Position hold)
– 4 in one ESC, (drivers for the motors)
– Runcam micro eagle camera and runcam sender (for first person view)
– Taranis receiver
– Inav Software

Team MakerBeam with Stefan Gschroefl from ConstrAct

Rotating cube

Stefan Gschroefl from ConstrAct sent us a few pictures from his rotating MakerBeam cube. It looks great.

The cube is made using MakerBeam. It now holds pictures of MakerBeam items and projects. Stefan is planning to attend the MakerFaire in Vienna in early May.

The rotation platform is custom 3D printed and runs slow. The rotation platform is powered by battery or external power source. It can be used for other things since the cubeholder itself is magnetic mounted.

 

Team MakerBeam

MakerBeam used to build quadcopter

From Norway we got the following message and some great pictures.

Just thought I’d send you some photos of a quadcopter I and a friend built recently, using MakerBeam aluminum profiles. We used 4×30 cm long beams to make the arms, and mounted a plexiglas plate and a plastic box on top, to hold the RC receiver and the controller card. Beneath the plate we made a battery mount, and fastened all the wires using zip ties. We also modified the motor mounts so that they could be screwed directly onto the beams.

I all, I find that MakerBeam is very easy to use, and it is also very easy to be creative and modify different designs. Great! However, I have some suggestions for additional features:

– The starter kit could come with a set of longer M3 screws, to make it easier to mount “external elements” (not MakerBeams)

– It would be nice to introduce some kind of “joint”, so that one beam could rotate relative to the other. A combination with some kind of spring would be nice. For example, in our quadcopter this could be used to introduce spring damping on the legs.

Hope you like the pictures, and good luck with further development,

Martin

 

We think it looks great! Thank you Martin.

If you have pictures, videos or suggestion for MakerBeam please let us know!!

Team MakerBeam.eu

3D printer nearly finished

From Bodenmann Electronics we received the good news that the 3D printer Joel is been working on is nearly finished. Pictures of this were already available on our site under News&Projects. Video footage of some test runs are available online.  Here is the video from test #1. In the video the Y-axis is tested.

httpv://youtu.be/k7T9jM97geY

Bodenmann Electronics by the way is a distributor of MakerBeam.

Team MakerBeam.eu

project Hexapod robot

From Dejan Kocbek from SMAKsoft we received pictures of his project hexapod with only 4 legs and 8 servomotors (economic version).  Though it is missing some legs to really be a true hexapod it is a great project! It is a good example of how to use makerbeam for robotics. Thank you Dejan!

SMAKsoft by the way is a distributor of MakerBeam.

Team MakerBeam.eu

MakerBeam knee joint by Sean Reynolds

The MakerBeam knee joint video shown here is the first in a series of cSprings videos Sean Reynolds put online. A project page is to come but in the mean time you can find a couple of videos  under his YouTube channel.

httpv://youtu.be/EPOEfrlR3uI

You should definitely see the other videos as well. They are great and very interesting. We of course love them because of the use of MakerBeam! I chose this video because at first glance it shows a simple setup.

It is a good example of MakerBeam as rapid prototyping tool. The added equipment, like the spring and hinges, make it clear you can add lots of things yourself. In the video an Arduino processor is driving the best servo on the market with a 5-20 lbs spring for flexability on the MakerBeam skeleton. MakerBeam provides the basics and you can build from there.

Team MakerBeam.eu

X-Y carriage

James Hardiman made a x-y carriage using MakerBeam and the bearings we sell through our webshop. It is the world’s first MakerBeam x-y carriage. Or so we think. Let us know if we are wrong.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=asl5LT2QF_U

The design looks good. We do have some comments though.  Here the bearings are on the inside of the frame. If you put them on the outside there is more space for the frame to move. Also if you use three bearings in one dimension it is stable. Then a single beam would be stable  and you do not need a frame to realise stability.

James Hardiman is working on a book about 3d printers. He is also looking into the power of making. What is happening with 3d printing, homemade cnc machines, sites like etsy.com and makerfaires in various places is sometimes referred to as the industrial revolution 2.0 or micromanufacturing.

Johan and James met each other in the Netherland at ProtoSpace, the fablab in Utrecht. There Johan handed James a MakerBeam starter kit. The x-y carriage is James his first serious MakerBeam project in connection with his book on 3d printers. We love the initiative. Thank you James!!

Team MakerBeam.eu