The Prophets – sculptures

Nicolas Sassoon is an artist based in Vancouver BC Canada. He makes use of early computer imaging techniques to render visions of architectures, landscapes and natural forces. Nicolas often uses MakerBeam to present his work.
The featured sculptures are part of a body of work titled “The Prophets”.

The Prophets is an on-going series of sculptures as poetic interfaces between computer technology and geological forces. Composed of small pumice boulders (volcanic rock) connected to LCD panels, the sculptures recall traditional viewing stones (Gongshi, Suiseki) from which electronic hardware and screens emerge to form heads and figures. The LCD screens feature pixelated animations evocative of flowing lava, suggesting a magmatic life silently contained within the stones. In The Prophets, technology becomes a vessel through which inert rocks appear to express another state of existence – a volcanic unrest hinting back at their chaotic origins. The sculptures bring about a singular experience, recounting a partial history of our relation with matter — a speculative geology of our digital condition rooted in volcanological processes and speaking to the connections between organic and inorganic materials.

Visit nicolassassoon.com for more information and more of Nicholas his work. Below are a few more picutures of his work.

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Micro Mars Rover

On Hackaday Ryan Kinnett introduced his micro Rover. It is modeled after the Mars rover designs. With Perseverance now on Mars a nice project to showcase here.

The suspension system modeled after JPL’s Mars rover designs was developed as a test platform for various control schemes. If you want to read and learn more please visit the page on Hackaday. Here is a link.

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Evan and Katelyn – Underwater Live Stream

Evan and Katelyn attempted the first fully underwater live stream and used MakerBeam to frame all their electronic equipment. The cube with equipment was placed in a waterproof casing so they could use it for their underwater live stream.

Evan and Katelyn love to make things and make a new video each week. In the video showcased here they attempt to make the first full underwater live stream. To hold all the electronic equipment they use MakerBeam (from 16:41). The MakerBeam framework with the camera, a screen and other electronics goes into a waterproof seethrough cube. Have fun watching!

Evan and Katelyn use MakerBeam to frame their electronics

MakerBeam is introduced as cute next to a bigger profile. Here are some pictures taken from the same video.

Naturally we agree, but MakerBeam is also very useful as you can see in the next few pictures.

All the electronics could be fitted nicely in the waterproof box and still be very portable.

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Voron 3D printer

Yesterday and today saw an influx of customers ordering 200mm and 100mm MakerBeamXL. Usually this means there is a project featured somewhere using these lengths. We searched the internet but could not find the project. We asked some customers and soon got the reply. VORONDESIGN is launching a new design of their 3D printer. The BOM and other information will be available soon. You can watch the video of the preview here.

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MakerBeam and the ‘Coupe de France de Robotique 2020’

In France we have two resellers: Lextronic and Génération Robots. The last one sponsored a team that is working towards the ‘Coupe de France de Robotique 2020’.

Estia system (@EstiaSystem) is a robot and mechatronic association that is affiliated with ESTIA – École Supérieure des Technologie Industrielle. They send @GenerationRobots a tweet to thank them for their sponsorship and added some nice pictures of their work aimed at participation at the competition.

The competition was set to take place at May 20-23 this year. Due to the Corona virus this date will probably not be met. Hopefully the competition will be rescheduled to a later date.

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NVDIA kaya robot

NVDIA created a robot that you can make. They deliberately designed it with 3D printed components and hobbyist components. So a wide range of people will be able to make the robot themselves. It was designed to showcase the Isaac Robot Engine running on the NVIDIA Jetson Nano platform. The Isaac SDK is the main software toolkit for NVIDIA robotics.

MakerBeam is used to create a frame and therefore it is mentioned on their bill of materials. Click here to go to a website of NVDIA with a lot more information about Kaya and how to assemble the Kaya robot.

The bill of materials mentions you can buy MakerBeam on Amazon.com. Which is correct, but you can also buy it from our shop MakerBeam.com directly. We ship worldwide.

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Adam Savage uses one of our 15x15mm profiles

Adam Savage, from Mythbuster fame, is a well known maker. For a video sponsored by Starbucks he made an aeolipile – or Hero’s engine. The engine is powered by liquid nitrogen. According to the comments accompanying the video the idea was that the engine would drive a pulley system that would pour sweet cream into Adam’s glass of Starbucks Nitro Cold Brew.

When we saw the video we suddenly realised Adam used one of our 15x15mm profiles: OpenBeam!

Adam is known to build a lot of things using a wide variety of materials. It was a surprise to see him use OpenBeam. In the video he does not mention the use of OpenBeam, but it is clear to see.

Using our profiles in the way Adam did, has two advantages. First it is possible to divide the making of the machine into separate projects without having to worry about the whole. All the created elements can always be fastened to the framework anyway.
The second advantage is coming from this first advantage. You can fully concentrate on making the machine, rather than having to start with building the outside. Our beams are great for prototyping or a proof of concept.

OpenBeam has the same size as MakerBeamXL, but has a lot more nooks and edges. Some have good use for these, others prefer the smooth look of MakerBeamXL. Since the profiles are both 15x15mm in diameter they can be used interchangeable.

You can find out more about Adam Savage and his work on his YouTube channel Tested: https://www.youtube.com/user/testedcom/featured

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3D Andy’s starter kit 3D printer/plotter/CNC – CNC video 3/3

This is the third and last video showing the CNC based on the content of a starter kit in action.

If you are interested in building this multfunctional device out of MakerBeam profiles you can contact Andy (3d.andy@gmx.net). He also has files published on Thingiverse (https://www.thingiverse.com/3DAndy/designs) with more to come.

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